Learn About: 21st Century | Charter Schools | Homework
Home / Edifier


The EDifier

September 29, 2014

New CPE study examines background, outcomes of high school graduates who don’t advance to college

2014-320_CPE_HP_slider2 The Center for Public Education is pleased to present The Path Least Taken, the first installment of a series that looks at the characteristics and outcomes of high school graduates who don’t go on to college.

Jim Hull, CPE’s senior policy analyst, sifted through data from the National Center for Education Statistics’ Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and found new insights into this segment of the population (Spoiler: the percentage of non-college-goers is smaller than we thought) and a new format to showcase these findings. You can find the full report here, along with other extras.






September 25, 2014

An increase in student homelessness

The National Center for Homeless Education reported that there were a total of 1.3 million homeless public school students in the United States during the 2012 – 2013 school year. The number of homeless students increased 8% from the previous year and 85% since the beginning of the recession. This number includes students whose families are sharing homes and students who are living in shelters, hotels, motels or without shelter altogether.

For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education asked the students whether they were living with their parents and recorded that 76,000 homeless students were “unaccompanied.” These unaccompanied minors face greater threats of physical and sexual abuse and exploitation.

EdWeek has reported that the increase in homelessness can be explained by “an inadequate supply of public housing and assistance, growing rent costs, and relatively flat income levels in recent years.” Furthermore, this information has prompted child welfare advocates to push for the passage of the Homeless Children and Youth Act, which would expand the definition of homelessness, remove federal restrictions, and require better data and information on homeless individuals.

This last piece of the proposed legislation is important because the numbers released by the NCHE tend to underestimate the number of homeless students, who may be embarrassed to talk about their living situation. Additionally, CNN Money reported that part of the increase in homeless students could be explained by more accurate measures of homelessness. Regardless, it is still apparent that the number of homeless students continues to rise in the wake of the recession.






September 23, 2014

What animation looks like from the beginning

Have you seen our latest animated creation? If you haven’t take a look.

Is It Worth It from Center for Public Education on Vimeo.

Hard to imagine, the process began like this over a year ago:

Earlysketches_Part1EarlysketchesPart2

Many thanks to our animator, Bart Collart, for bringing our ideas to life.

Filed under: CPE,Data,Public education — Tags: , , — NDillon @ 11:59 am





September 19, 2014

Proposed changes to TFA program are response to criticisms

Teach for America is responding to widespread criticism of its controversial teacher preparation program which attracts recent college graduates, provides a six-week summer training program, places them in high-needs schools across the country and requires a two-year teaching commitment. Critics have argued that TFA has encouraged high levels of teacher turnover by requiring only a two year commitment and has irresponsibly placed unprepared teachers into communities vastly different from their own. However, it seems that TFA is listening to and using these critiques to better their program and the education of the students they serve. Two new TFA co-CEOs, Matt Kramer and Elisa Villanueva Beard, are beginning to implement major changes to the well-established TFA model. Here are some highlights of the reforms:

  • Providing a full year pre-training program for early decision applicants: This full year pre-training program will mainly consist of online sessions focused around the history of inequality in the United States, classroom training techniques and may give these prospective teachers opportunity to visit classrooms in high-poverty communities.
  • Placing teachers in communities where they have personal ties
  • Encouraging teachers to commit to five years instead of two
  • Continuing instructional coaching during the five year commitment and providing stipends to pursue graduate studies in education

While it is admirable that TFA is responding to criticism, the main question is whether or not these changes will lead to more qualified and better prepared TFA teachers. Will this year of online preparation with some classroom visits be sufficient preparation for these teachers? Learning about poverty and classroom techniques online is surely different from knowing how to apply this knowledge in a classroom filled with underserved children. Parents of public school children believe the answer lies in more rigorous and longer teacher preparation and training. In the recently released PDK/Gallup poll “The Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools,” 75% of public school parents replied that teachers should spend one year or more “practicing teaching under the guidance of a certified teacher before assuming responsibility of his or her own classroom.” TFA needs to continue to make changes in its program but should work to align these changes with the wishes of public school parents who demand better prepared teachers for their children.

Filed under: CPE,teachers — Tags: , , — Courtney Spetko @ 7:00 am





September 18, 2014

PDK/Gallup poll Part 2 shows teachers matter

The folks at PDK and Gallup apparently had so much to report in this year’s annual poll of public attitudes toward public schools, they had to release it in two parts. Part 1, which we summarized here, addressed the Common Core state standards and perceptions about public schools more generally. Part 2, released this week, focuses primarily on public attitudes about the teaching profession. What they have to say should provide comfort to beleaguered teachers.

First, nearly two-thirds of the public expresses “trust and confidence in the men and women teaching children in the public schools.” The study’s authors note that this represents a decline from previous years. Nonetheless, it must be a refreshing show of support for teachers who have many reasons to feel beat up by the punditry.

The public also recognizes the key role teachers play in student learning and by large margins would welcome policies to bolster their preparation and training. A full 81% believe prospective teachers should be required to “pass board certification” similar to that for other professionals like doctors and lawyers on top of their college degree in order to be licensed to teach. Likewise, 60% thought that there should be higher entrance requirements into teacher prep programs at the front end. The majority also support the idea of requiring a longer period of supervised practice before teachers take charge of their own classrooms. A plurality of 44% thought such a bridge period should last one year with 27% saying new teachers need two (see chart).

 

PDK2

 

Political affiliation had almost no effect on opinions about teacher preparation. Republicans, Democrats and Independents alike called for increasing rigor. Not so when asked about teacher evaluation, however, possibly in response to growing political controversy over new evaluation policies that are based in part on teachers’ impact on student learning. Nationally, 61% of the public opposes evaluations that include “how well a teacher’s students perform on standardized tests.” Yet only 50% of Republicans were opposed compared to 68% of Democrats. Interestingly, overall opposition to using evaluation in this way is much higher now than it was just two years ago when slightly less than half of the overall public thought it was a bad idea.

Similar party-affiliation gaps were evident when pollsters asked about the purposes of evaluation: 86% of Democrats said using evaluation to help “teachers improve” was “very important” compared to 71% of Republicans. In contrast, Republicans were much more favorable to linking evaluation to salaries or bonuses: 51% of Republicans said this was “very important” compared to only 41% of Democrats.

Other questions explored whether the public thinks their schools need to change “to meet today’s needs” and if so, how. More than half (58%) said that schools need to change compared to 47% who though so in 2006. The biggest needed change the public would like to see is a greater emphasis on career-technical education: 60% “strongly agreed” that “high school students should receive more education about possible career choices” while 32% said the same about placing “more emphasis” on college preparation for all.

This doesn’t necessarily mean that the public thinks career education is more important than college readiness. It could indicate that they think high schools are doing ok with college prep but they need to do more to get students ready for work. But either way, the message is clear that the public is looking toward high schools to make sure all graduates are able to thrive in the new workplace.

Along those lines, CPE’s Jim Hull has been analyzing work and other outcomes for the group of high school graduates who do not go to a two- or four-year college. His findings should produce some valuable insights into what career-readiness should look like. His first report will be released in the next two weeks so stay tuned. – Patte Barth






Older Posts »
RSS Feed