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October 28, 2015

U.S. Performance Slumps According to National Report Card

U.S. Performance Slumps According to National Report Card

There is simply no way to sugar coat today’s NAEP 4th and 8th grade math and reading results. They were disappointing to say the least. With the exception of a few states and districts results remained flat or declined across both grades and subjects between 2015 and the last administration in 2013.

Specifically, national math scores declined between 2013 and 2015 at both the 4th and 8th grade levels, while reading scores dipped in 8th grade but remained steady at the 4th grade level. States didn’t fare much better during this time period either. In fact, no state made any significant improvement in 8th grade math while Mississippi, Washington, DC, and Department of Defense schools made modest gains at the 4th grade level. Of the 20 large districts that participated in NAEP in both 2013 and 2015, only Chicago improved over their 2013 results at the 8th grade level. Washington, DC, Miami-Dade, and Dallas improved their performance as well at the 4th grade level while the scores in 7 districts declined.

When it came to reading West Virginia was the lone bright spot at the 8th grade level by being the only state to post gains from 2013 to 2015. In 4th grade reading, 13 states made significant gains topped by Washington, DC (7 points), Louisiana (6 points), Mississippi (6 points), and Oklahoma (5 points) which all made gains of 5 or more points since 2013. Miami-Dade was the only district to post gains at the 8th grade level while Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington, DC made gains in 4th grade. Most districts neither saw improvement nor declines in either 4th or 8th grade.

While this year’s NAEP results are disheartening, one data point does not make a trend. Keep in mind, NAEP scores have steadily increased over the past 25 years. In fact, even with this year’s declines 8th graders still scored 19 points higher in math than 8th graders in 1990 which equates to nearly two years’ worth of learning. Since 2000 8th graders have improved their math performance by 9 points—nearly a year’s worth of learning.  So while scores declined in 2015, it does not necessarily mean our schools are less effective. The results from this and every NAEP release should be based on the larger trend which has shown steady gains over the past decade.

But this also does not mean this year’s NAEP results should be ignored. Researchers, policymakers, and educators should take a deep look at these results as well as other indicators of school quality such as results from state assessments to determine if they provide evidence on whether this year’s NAEP results are an anomaly or the start of a new downward trend. By examining NAEP scores along with other measures of school quality policymakers can make more informed decisions on what is needed to support our public schools.

 

The Findings

 

     4th Grade Math

District Level

  • Of the 20 large urban school districts that took part in NAEP in both 2013 and 2015 Washington, DC, Miami-Dade, and Dallas were the only districts to make significant gains.
    • On the other hand, 7 districts saw declines in their average 4th grade mathematics scores since 2013.
  • Charlotte, Hillsborough (FL), and Austin were the highest performing districts, while Detroit, Baltimore City, and Cleveland were the lowest performing.

State Level

  • At the state level scores increased between 2013 and 2015 in three states/jurisdictions (Mississippi, Washington, DC, and Department of Defense schools). Fifteen states had increased their scores between 2011 and 2013
    • 16 state saw declines in their average 4th grade mathematics score since 2013. No state saw declines between 2011 and 2013.
  • Massachusetts, Minnesota and New Hampshire were the highest performing states, while Alabama, New Mexico, and Washington, DC were the lowest performing.

National Level

  • Nationally, scores dropped by 2 points between 2013 and 2015.
    • Student achievement in math has increased by 27 points (2.5 year’s worth of learning) since 1990, the 1st year of NAEP.
  • The percent of students scoring at or above NAEP’s Proficient level dropped by 2 percentage points between 2013 and 2015 (42 and 40 percent respectively).
    • The proficiency rate has more than tripled since 1990 (13 percent in 1990 vs. 40 percent in 2015).
    • Moreover, the percent of students scoring below NAEP’s Basic level has increased from 17 percent in 2013 to 18 percent in 2013. In 1990 50 percent of 4th graders scored below the Basic level.

 

8th Grade Math

District Level

  • Between 2013 and 2015 Chicago was the only district to make significant gains.
    • Only Hillsborough (FL) and Houston saw declines during this time period.
  • Just as with 4th grade math, Charlotte, Austin, and Boston were the highest performing districts, while Detroit, Baltimore City, and Cleveland were the lowest performing.

State Level

  • At the 8th grade level, 22 states saw declines in their scores between 2013 and 2015, while not a single state made statistically significant improvements during this time.
  • Massachusetts continues to post the highest 8th grade math scores, with New Hampshire, Minnesota and New Jersey close behind. Washington, DC, Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi scored the lowest.

National Level

  • Between 2013 and 2015 national scores fell 3 points for the first time. However, students in 2015 have obtained about two more years’ worth of learning in math than students in 1990.
  • The percent of students reaching NAEP’s Proficient level has more than doubled from 15 percent in 1990 to 33 percent in 2015. The percent scoring below NAEP’s Basic level decreased from 48 percent to 29 during the same time period.

4th Grade Reading

 

District Level

  • Of the 20 large urban school districts that took part in NAEP in both 2013 and 2015 Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington, DC were the only districts to make significant gains.
    • On the other hand, Baltimore City was the only district that saw declines in their scores during the same time period.
  • Hillsborough (FL), Miami-Dade and Charlotte were the highest scoring districts, while Detroit, Cleveland, and Baltimore City were the lowest scoring.

State Level

  • At the state level, scores increased between 2013 and 2015 in 13 states/jurisdictions. Only Maryland and Minnesota saw their scores decline during this time period.
  • Five states saw their scores increase by more than 5 points during this time period with Washington, DC leading the way with a 7 point gain followed by Louisiana (6 points), Mississippi (6 points) and Oklahoma (5 points).
  • Massachusetts, Department of Defense schools, and New Hampshire were the highest performing states, while New Mexico, Washington, DC, California, and Alaska were the lowest performing.

National Level

  • Nationally, scores increased by 1 point from 2013 and 2015 but the increase was not statistically significant, meaning the increase likely happened by chance.
  • The percent of students scoring at or above NAEP’s Proficient level increased by 1 percentage point between 2013 and 2015 (35 and 36 percent respectively) but the increase was not statistically significant either.
    • The proficiency rate has increased from 29 percent in 1992 to 36 percent in 2015.
    • Moreover, the percent of students scoring below NAEP’s Basic level has decreased from 32 percent in 2013 to 31 percent in 2015. In 1992 38 percent of 4th graders scored below the Basic level.

8th Grade Reading

District Level

  • Between 2013 and 2015 Miami-Dade was the only district to make significant gains.
    • Only Hillsborough (FL), Albuquerque and Baltimore City saw declines during this time period.
  • Among the highest performing districts were Charlotte, Austin, Miami-Dade and San Diego, while Detroit, Baltimore City, Cleveland, and Fresno were the lowest performing.

State Level

  • At the 8th grade level, 8 states saw declines in their scores between 2013 and 2015, while West Virginia was the only state to increase their score during this time.
  • Department of Defense schools posted the highest reading scores, with New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Vermont close behind. On the other hand, Washington, DC, Mississippi, and New Mexico scored the lowest.

National Level

  • Between 2013 and 2015 scores fell 3 points bring the overall score back down to the 2011 level of 265 which had been the all-time prior to 2013.
  • The percent of students reaching NAEP’s proficient level decreased from 36 to 34 percent between 2013 and 2015. During this same time period the percent scoring below NAEP’s Basic level increased from 22 percent to 24 percent.
Filed under: NAEP,Report Summary — Jim Hull @ 3:39 pm





October 27, 2015

Fewer, better tests

TestingParents have been concerned about the amount of testing their children have been subjected to in recent years. To the point where some are choosing to opt their children out of certain standardized tests. Yet, a number of educators, policymakers and education organizations have expressed the need for such tests to identify those students whose needs are not being fully met—particularly poor, minority and other traditionally disadvantaged students. Unfortunately, it has been unclear how much testing is actually taking place in our nation’s schools.

But yesterday, a report from the Council of Great City Schools (CGCS) provided the most comprehensive examination of testing to date that shed an important light on the quantity and quality of testing students are exposed to. Among the findings the report found:

  • The average eighth-grader spends 25.3 hours per year taking mandated assessments which accounts for 4.22 days or 2.34 percent of total instructional time.
    • Only 8.9 hours of this testing is due to NCLB mandated assessments.
    • Formative assessments are most likely to be given three times a year and account for 10.8 hours of testing for eighth-graders 
  • There is no correlation between the amount of mandated testing and the performance on the National Assessment for Education Progress (NAEP).
  • Urban school districts have more tests designed for diagnostic purposes than other uses.
  • Opt-out rates in the 66 school districts that participated in the study were typically less than 1 percent.
  • 78 percent of parents surveyed agreed or strongly agreed with the statement “accountability for how well my child is educated is important, and it begins with accurate measurement of what he/she is learning in school.”
    • Yet, fewer agreed when the word ‘test’ appears.
  • Parents support ‘better’ tests but are not necessarily as supportive of ‘harder’ or ‘more rigorous’ tests.

These are much needed findings in the debate about testing, which has been dominated by anecdotal accounts and theoretical arguments. CGCS’s report has provided much needed facts to inform policymakers on time spent on testing, as well as, the quality and usefulness of the tests. In fact, these findings led President Obama to propose the amount of time students spend on mandatory tests be limited to 2 percent of instructional time.

While limiting the time students spend taking tests is a good thing, the report highlights the fact that over-testing is not necessarily a quantity problem but a quality problem. For example, the report found that many of the tests were not aligned to each other nor aligned to college- and career-ready standards. Meaning, many students were administered unnecessary and redundant tests that provided little, if any, information to improve instruction. Moreover, results for many tests, including some formative assessments, were not available for months after they were taken, thereby failing to provide teachers information in-time to adjust their instruction. So, the information for many tests are neither timely nor useful.

For testing to drive quality instruction, testing systems must be aligned to college- and career-ready standards and provide usable and timely information.  Doing so does not necessarily lead to less testing time but it does lead to a more efficient testing system. While there is plenty of blame to go around for the lack of a coherent testing system, district leaders play a lead role in ensuring that each and every test is worth taking. Tools such as Achieve’s Student Assessment Inventory for School Districts can inform district leaders on how much testing is actually taking place in their classrooms and why. With such information in-hand they can make more informed decisions on which tests to continue using and which should be eliminated, as well as, if there is a need for better tests that provide a more accurate measure of what students are expected to learn. By doing so, it will create a more coherent testing system that consists of fewer and better test that will drive quality instruction that will in-turn improve student outcomes. – Jim Hull






September 3, 2015

Fewer High School Grads Ready for College According to Latest Recent SAT results

Just as last year, this year’s SAT results included results from the College Board’s two other testing programs— the PSAT/NMSQT and their Advanced Placement (AP) exams— providing a more complete picture of student progress towards college readiness throughout high school.

While ACT results released last week showed overall scores among the graduating class of 2015 remaining flat, SAT scores saw a significant drop. In fact, scores on the college-entrance exam are at the lowest level in the ten years since the College Board included a writing section to go along with the critical reading and mathematics sections. Not only have SAT scores been declining in the long-run, scores dropped by 7 points in just the past year alone. Making it the largest one-year drop since the inclusion of the writing section. Furthermore, scores dropped in each of the three sections as well.

Stark differences are also evident when it comes to the ACT and SAT college-readiness benchmarks. According to the ACT, slightly more students are graduating high school college-ready than in the previous year. Yet, SAT results show fewer students are graduating college-ready. Although each exam has their own method of determining college-readiness, it would be expected that the year-to-year changes would be somewhat similar. However, that is not the case for the 2015 results.

Since neither the ACT nor SAT are representative of all high school graduates nationwide it is impossible to pinpoint why the two tests are providing such conflicting information about the quality of our nation’s high schools. That is because in most states these tests are optional, so only those students expecting to go onto a four-year college are likely to take the exams. Furthermore, there are a number of students who take both the SAT and ACT, so their scores are counted twice which can impact scores as well. Furthermore, the ACT and SAT measure different skills, although in the coming years this will be less of an issue as the SAT will be redesigned to align with the Common Core which the ACT already is.

However, there can be a number of reasons why ACT and SAT are providing such conflicting reports. It could be that since the ACT has become more popular throughout the country and more colleges are accepting the ACT that fewer higher-performing students in traditional ACT states may be taking the SAT but still taking the ACT. It could also be that more lower-performing students, who previously would not have taken the SAT, are now taking the college-entrance exam which would lower SAT scores, at least the short-run.

Unfortunately, there is not a clear answer. But considering the fact that almost every other indicator of the effectiveness of our nation’s high schools points in a positive direction, we shouldn’t put too much weight on one indicator such as the SAT. We know that more students than ever are graduating on-time with a regular diploma and do so by having completed more rigorous courses. Moreover, more of these graduates are going on to college than ever before. Yet, despite these positive results this year’s SAT results paint a much dimmer picture. With that said, it will be important to keep our eyes on the SAT results in the coming years to see if this year’s results are an anomaly or the start of trend. In the meantime, educators, school board members, and other policymakers shouldn’t put too much stock in one year’s results but should dig deeper into the SAT results for their local schools to see what they can learn so they can better prepare future graduates to get into and succeed in college.—Jim Hull

 

The Findings

Overall SAT Scores

  • The combined score in each of the three SAT sections- Critical Reading, Mathematics, and Writing— were at a 10-year low of 1490 when the Writing section was first introduced.
  • The combined scored dropped 7 points in just one year. This is the largest drop in a single year since the Writing section was introduced.
  • Scores dropped in all three sections from 2014 to 2015.
    • Critical Reading declined from 497 to 495.
    • Mathematics scores fell from 513 to 511.
    • Writing scores dropped from 487 to 484.

College Readiness

  • Less than half (41.9 percent) of the test-takers met the SAT College-Ready Benchmark in 2015, which is a decrease from 2014 when the rate was 43 percent.
    • The SAT College-Ready Benchmarks represent a student who scores a combined 1550 or higher. Students hitting this benchmark have a 65 percent chance of earning a B-minus grade point average in their freshman year courses.
  • Minority students less likely to be college-ready.
    • Just 16.1 percent of black students and 22.7 percent of Hispanic students were college-ready, according to the SAT’s Benchmark.
      • More black students reached the college-ready benchmark in 2015 than in 2014 (15.8 percent).
      • However, fewer Hispanic students reached the college-ready benchmark in 2015 compared to 2014 (23.4 percent).
    • On the other hand, over half (52.8 percent) of white students met the benchmark in 2015 and 61.3 percent of Asian’s students.

SAT Test Takers

  • Just over 1.7 million students from the Class of 2015 took the SAT sometime during their high school which was a 3 percent increase from 2011.
  • More minority students taking the SAT.
    • Nearly a third (32.5 percent) of test-takers were underrepresented minorities in 2015, compared to 31.3 percent just a year earlier and 29 percent in 2011.

PSAT/MNSQT (10th grade exams) Results

  • Nearly 4 out of 10 10th graders who took the College Board’s PSAT or NMSQT exams in 2015 scored at the grade-level benchmark that indicates they were on track for college and career readiness.
  • Just 16.7 percent of black 10th graders who took the PSAT/NMSQT reached the grade-level benchmark in 2015 while 54.7 of white examinees did so.
  • Only 19.8 percent of Hispanic examinees met the grade-level benchmark while 61.5 of Asian examinees did so.

 

Advanced Placement (AP)

  • In 2015, 2.5 million students took at least one AP exam compared to 2.3 million a year earlier and 2.0 in 2011.
    • In total, 4.5 million AP exams were administered in 2015 compared to 4.2 million in 2014 and 3.5 million in 2011.
  • As more students took an AP exam more students passed an AP exam as well. The number of students scoring a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam increased from 1.4 million in 2014 to 1.5 million in 2015. In 2011, just 1.2 million students passed at least one AP exam.
    • Minority students less likely to pass at least one AP exam.
      • A third (32.3 percent) of black students who took at least one AP exam scored a 3 or higher compared to 66 percent of white examinees.
      • Half of Hispanic examinees passed at least one AP exam.
      • Nearly three-quarters (72.2 percent) of Asian examinees scored 3 or higher on at least one AP exam.
  • Over a quarter (26.2) of students who took an AP exam were from an underrepresented minority group which is slightly higher than in 2014, when the percentage was 26.0 percent. However, it is a significant increase from the 23.9 percent in 2011.





August 27, 2015

More students graduating high school college-ready according to new ACT report

According to ACT’s The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2015 report released earlier this week, a growing proportion of high school students are graduating from high school college-ready. While overall scores remained flat, more students scored high enough to reach the ACT college-ready benchmarks in each of the test’s four subject areas- English, reading, math, and science. However, just 28 percent of test-takers reached these benchmarks in 2015 but it is still higher than the 23 percent who reached all four benchmarks in 2009. So, while college-readiness rates remain low, they have been trending higher even as more states require all students to take the college entrance exam and more students head to college than ever before. Keep in mind, such dramatic increases in those being tested typically has a dampening effect on scores.

Unlike college-readiness benchmarks, overall scores remained flat between 2014 and 2015. In fact, overall scores have remained between 20.9 and 21.1 for over a decade, with the exception of 2007 when the overall score reached 21.2. However, a closer look at the overall results show that white, black, and Hispanic students all saw increases in their scores over the past year. So, while overall scores have remained flat, the scores of each of the subgroups have improved. This happens because more black and Hispanic students—who score significantly lower ‘on-average’- are taking the ACT while a smaller proportion of white students- who score higher ‘on-average’- are taking the test. As a result, each of the subgroups’ scores increased while the overall score remained flat. This is what statisticians call ‘Simpson’s Paradox’.

While the results are not earth shattering they provide evidence that our high schools are in fact doing a better job preparing students for college. Yes, we all want to see faster improvement but improving nearly 25,000 high schools does not happen overnight. Fortunately, most indicators of the effectiveness of our nation’s high schools show they are heading in the right direction. More students are graduating high school on-time than ever before and more students are getting into and enrolling in college as well. Add the fact that more high school graduates are college-ready paints a pretty clear picture that our nation’s high schools are on the right path.

 

The Findings

State Scores

  • Of the 30 states where at least half of graduates took the ACT:
    • Minnesota once again achieved the highest composite score with 22.7.
      • However, just 78 percent of Minnesota 2015 graduates took the ACT
    • Graduates from Hawaii posted the lowest scores among states with a score of 18.5.
  • Of the 15 states where at least 90 percent of graduates took the ACT:
    • Colorado and Illinois posted the highest scores at 20.7, followed by North Dakota (20.6).
    • Hawaii (18.5), Mississippi (19.0), and Alabama (19.1) had the lowest scores out of this group.
    • Hawaii posted the greatest gains since 2014, improving by three-tenths of a point.
      • Alabama saw their scores drop by 1.5 points over the past year. However, this is likely due to the fact that the percent of graduates taking the ACT increased from 80 to 100 percent. Such increases typically lead to lower-scores, at least in the short-term.

National Scores

  • The nation’s graduating Class of 2015 had an average composite score of 21.0, the same as in 2014.
    • At this score, an average high school graduate has about a 75 percent chance of getting admitted into a good college.*
  • Scores increased by one-tenth of a point in reading (21.4), English (20.4) and science (20.9) between 2014 and 2015, while scores decreased by one-tenth of a point on the math test (20.8).
  • Scores for black and white students improved.
    • White graduates increased their scores by one-tenth of a point between 2014 and 2015 (22.3 to 22.4).
    • The average black graduate score improved from 17.0 to 17.1 over the past year.
    • As for Hispanic graduates, their scores increased from 18.8 to 18.9 in the past year as well.

College Readiness

  • Twenty-eight percent of 2015 high school graduates were college-ready in all four ACT subject tests (English, reading, math, and science), which is two percentage points higher than in 2014 and five percentage point increase since 2009.
    • Graduates who achieve these benchmarks are ready to succeed in first-year, credit-bearing college courses in the specific subjects ACT tests, according to ACT research. “Success” is defined as a 75% likelihood of earning a ‘C’ or better in the relevant course.
  • Little change in college readiness by subject.
    • The number of graduates reaching ACT’s college-ready benchmark in science increased from 37 to 38 percent over the past year.
    • In math, the number of graduates deemed college-ready decreased by one percent as was the case between 2013 and 2014.
    • In English there was no change in the number of graduates being college-ready but there was a two percentage point increase in reading.

Core Course Rigor

  • Graduates who completed ACT’s recommended core curriculum were much more likely to be college-ready.
    • Two-thirds (67 percent) of graduates who completed ACT’s Core Courses (4 years of English, and 3 years each of math, social studies, and science) met ACT’s college-ready benchmark in English compared to 36 percent of those who did not complete the Core Courses. In reading, 49 percent of graduates who completed the Core Courses met ACT’s college-ready benchmarks for reading compared to 34 percent who did not.
    • There was a much greater disparity when it came to math and science.
      • For those graduates who completed the Core Courses, nearly half (45 percent) were college-ready in math compared to just eight percent who had not.
      • For those graduates who completed the Core Courses, 42 percent were college-ready in science compared to just 18 percent who had not.

Test Takers

  • About 59 percent of all 2015 high graduates took the ACT, compared to 57 percent in 2014 and 45 percent in 2009.
  • More minority graduates are taking the ACT.
    • In 2015, nearly 29 percent of ACT test-takers were Hispanic or black, compared to 24 percent in 2010.
    • Furthermore, the percentage of test-takers who were white decreased between 2010 and 2015, from 62 percent to 55 percent.

 

For more information on how to use college entrance exam scores to evaluate your school, check out the Center’s Data First Web site.

* Data based on calculations from the Center for Public Education’s Chasing the College Acceptance Letter: Is it harder to get into college






August 25, 2015

New Poll Shows Parents Skeptical of Common Core and Testing

Public school parents and the public at large are skeptical of the Common Core State Standards (Common Core) and the usefulness of standardized testing, according to The 47th Annual PDK/Gallup Poll of The Public Attitudes Toward The Public Schools released this week. The annual poll also found that while parents like to have a choice on where to send their child to school, they oppose the use of public dollars to send students to private schools in the form of vouchers.

The poll’s findings show the general public, as well as, parents of public school children value other measures of school effectiveness beyond standardized tests. However, the results should not be seen as a total indictment of standardized tests, as results show the public is just as skeptical about allowing students to opt-out of standardized tests. This aligns with the results of the most recent Education Next poll which found the majority of the public supportive of the federal requirement to test students annually in math and reading. So, while the public may be getting weary of standardized testing, there is little support for their abolishment, especially among black and Hispanics. However, the public clearly feels that schools should be judged by more than test scores.

 

The Findings

Standardized Testing

  • The public places a much higher importance on student engagement over standardized tests.
    • Nationally, 78 percent of respondents rated student engagement as ‘very important’ when it came to measuring the effectiveness of public schools in their community.
    • On the other hand, just 14 percent of respondents rated standardized tests as ‘very important,’ making it the lowest-rated measure included in the survey.
  • Scores from standardized tests were the lowest rated approach of the choices given in the poll to providing the most accurate picture of a public school’s academic progress.
    • The public preferred examples of student work (38 percent), written observations by teachers (26 percent), and grades awarded by the teacher (21 percent) over scores from standardized tests (16 percent)
    • However, black respondents favored scores from standardized tests more than white respondents (19 v 15 percent).
  • Most believe there is too much emphasis on standardized tests.
    • Two-thirds of public school parents feel there is too much emphasis on testing while just 19 percent feel there is just the right amount of emphasis on testing.
    • However, black respondents were less likely to say there is too much emphasis on testing than white respondents (57 v 65 percent).
  • Respondents are split on whether to allow parents to ‘opt-out’ their child from standardized tests.
    • Just 41 percent of parents believed they should be allowed to excuse their child from tests while 44 believed such an option shouldn’t be allowed.
    • Yet, just 28 percent of black respondents believed parents should be able to excuse their child from standardized tests compared to 44 percent of white respondents.
  • Few students complain about taking too many standardized tests.
    • Just 16 percent of public school parents ‘strongly agreed’ that their child complains about taking too many standardized tests.
  • Most public school parents don’t believe it is important to know how students in their community’s schools perform on standardized tests compared to students in other districts, states, or countries.
    • Just 18 percent of respondents said they believed it was important to compare test schools from their community’s schools to those in other districts or states.
    • A greater percentage (24 percent) did say it was important to compare test schools with students from other countries.

Common Core

  • Few public school parents feel achievement standards are too low in their community.
    • A third of public school parents feel student achievement standards are too low compared to 12 percent who feel they are too high.
    • Nearly half (48 percent) believe achievement standards are just about right.
  • Majority of parents oppose having teachers in their community use the Common Core standards to guide what they teach.
    • 54 percent of parents oppose the use of Common Core compared to just 25 percent who are in favor.
    • Most Republicans (69 percent) oppose the use of the standards while Democrats (38 percent) feel the same. Half of Independents also oppose the use of the Common Core.
    • Blacks are less likely to oppose the use of the Common Core compared to whites (35 v 57 percent).
  • Few have heard a great deal about the Common Core.
    • Less than a quarter (22 percent) of respondents have heard a great deal about the Common Core although the percentage increases to 30 percent for public school parents.
    • Republicans (25 percent) are more likely to say they have heard about the Common Core than Democrats (19 percent) or Independents (22 percent).

Opinions about Public Schools

  • Local public schools receive high marks.
    • 70 percent of public school parents give the school their oldest child attends an A or B, while 57 percent gave the same grades to all public schools in their community.
    • However, just 19 percent of public school parents would give schools nationally an A or B.
  •  The public sees funding as a major tool to improving public schools.
    • Nearly a quarter (23 percent) of respondents listed lack of financial support as the biggest problem facing public schools. Standards/quality of education came in second with just 7 percent.
    • Nearly half (45 percent) of respondents believe that how much money schools spend is important to improving public schools in their community.

School Choice

  • Most respondents favor public school choice programs.
    • 64 percent of respondents favor charter schools and intra-district school choice programs.
  • Most respondents oppose vouchers
    • Just 31 percent of respondents favor allowing parents to choose a private school to attend at public expense.
    • Republicans are split on this issue (46 percent opposed and 46 in favor) while Democrats are thoroughly opposed (71 percent opposed to 16 percent in favor). The majority of independents are also oppose (63 percent).

 






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