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March 5, 2013

Looking for a summer internship? Then look no further

Looking for a real world experience conducting education research for the Summer 2013 semester? Want that research to be published? Then look no further. NSBA’s Center for Public Education (CPE) seeks a policy research intern to work closely with CPE’s senior policy analyst in conducting education policy research. Previous CPE interns have had their research published on this website as well as gained attention via the national media and you can too.

CPE is a national resource for accurate, timely, and credible information about public education and its importance to the well-being of our nation. CPE provides up-to-date research, data, and analysis on current education issues and explores ways to improve student achievement and engage public support for public schools.

Primary duties include: Write a research report to be published on the CPE website as well as summarize findings of significant education reports on CPE’s blog, update CPE’s previous reports, and attend briefings/conferences in the Washington, DC area.

Job qualifications: A graduate or undergraduate student studying education policy, public policy, statistics, economics, or a related field. The student should also have a strong interest in education policy and research.

The internship begins in late May and concludes in August and requires a minimum of 10 to 15 hours a week. The internship is unpaid. However, CPE will work with your school to satisfy any requirements for you to receive course credit.

Send a cover letter, resume, and writing sample to: Jim Hull 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 or e-mail to jhull@nsba.org with the subject line Policy Research Intern. Please contact Jim Hull at 703-838-6758 or jhull@nsba.org with any questions about the internship.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jim Hull @ 3:21 pm





December 18, 2012

Despite tragedy, statistics show schools still a safe haven

A series of mass shootings have darkened the United States in recent months and while all of them were tragic, senseless acts of violence, the travesty that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School last Friday seems to have elicited a far more visceral reaction in our country. This is not supposed to happen. Not in our schools, not to our children. The grief is unimaginable and the questions unceasing.

How did this happen? What went wrong? Could this have been stopped? How can this be avoided in the future? As a society, we all have a lot of soul-searching do to in the days, weeks, and months ahead. School systems will be asking themselves these questions, too, as they comb through their safety procedures and emergency protocols, ever mindful of their obligation to protect those in their charge.

While it may sound hollow now, the truth of the matter is schools are one of the safest environments in the nation and have been getting progressively so.

According to the CDC’s School Associated Violent Death Study, less than 1 percent of all homicides among school-aged children occur on school grounds or en route to school. In raw numbers, 17 children between the ages of five and 18 were killed at or on their way to school during the 2009-2010 academic year; a fraction of the 50 million students who attend school. And this figure is about half of what it was in the 1990s, when another school shooting, this one in Colorado’s Columbine High School, shocked the nation.

Since then, schools have enacted much tighter safety measures, installing security cameras and guards, developing emergency plans in concert with local first-responders, and controlling access to building entrances, as Sandy Hook apparently did. School officials have also tried to address the root causes of such violence through bullying prevention initiatives, character education and conflict resolution programs. But as we’ve known and acknowledged, schools cannot do it all themselves, especially when dwindling budgets force them to cut positions like school counselors and deranged outsiders arm themselves with high-powered weapons and force themselves in.

Ensuring that schools remain the safe, nurturing learning environment they’ve always been is everyone’s responsibility and it’s because of this that Friday’s tragedy should be a call to action for us all.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy






November 1, 2012

Now accepting applications for the spring 2013 internship program

Looking for a real world experience conducting education research for the Spring 2013 semester? Then look no further. NSBA’s Center for Public Education (The Center) seeks an intern to work closely with the Center’s senior policy analyst in conducting education policy research. The Center is a national resource for accurate, timely, and credible information about public education and its importance to the well-being of our nation. The Center provides up-to-date research, data, and analysis on current education issues and explores ways to improve student achievement and engage public support for public schools.

Primary duties include: Conduct research for the Center’s next original research report as well as summarize findings of significant education reports on the Center’s blog, update the Center’s previous reports, and attend briefings/conferences in the Washington, DC area.

Job qualifications: A graduate or undergraduate student studying education policy, public policy, statistics, economics, or a related field. The student should also have a strong interest in education policy and research. Background in statistical packages such as SAS and SPSS is preferred but not required.

The internship begins in late January/early February and concludes in May and requires a minimum of 10 hours a week. The internship is unpaid. However, the Center will work with your school to satisfy any requirements for you to receive course credit.

Email your cover letter, resume, and writing sample to jhull@nsba.org with the subject line Policy Research Intern. Please contact Jim Hull at 703-838-6758 or jhull@nsba.org with any questions about the internship.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jim Hull @ 2:56 pm





September 10, 2012

Looking for a fall internship?

Looking for a real world experience conducting education research for the Fall 2012 semester? Then look no further. NSBA’s Center for Public Education (The Center) seeks an intern to work closely with the Center’s senior policy analyst in conducting education policy research. The Center is a national resource for accurate, timely, and credible information about public education and its importance to the well-being of our nation. The Center provides up-to-date research, data, and analysis on current education issues and explores ways to improve student achievement and engage public support for public schools.

Primary duties include: Conduct research for the Center’s next original research report as well as summarize findings of significant education reports on the Center’s blog, update the Center’s previous reports, and attend briefings/conferences in the Washington, DC area.

Job qualifications: A graduate or undergraduate student studying education policy, public policy, statistics, economics, or a related field. The student should also have a strong interest in education policy and research. Background in statistical packages such as SAS and SPSS is preferred but not required.

The internship begins in late September and concludes in December and requires a minimum of 10 to 15 hours a week. The internship is unpaid. However, the Center will work with your school to satisfy any requirements for you to receive course credit.

Send a cover letter, resume, and writing sample to: Jim Hull 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 or e-mail to jhull@nsba.org with the subject line Policy Research Intern. Please contact Jim Hull at 703-838-6758 or jhull@nsba.org with any questions about the internship.

Filed under: Uncategorized — Jim Hull @ 11:55 am





August 2, 2012

What Makes for an ’Irreplaceable’ Teacher?

I just started reading the new the New Teacher Project (TNTP) report The Irreplaceables and there were a couple of statistics in the first couple of pages that really stuck out.

The best teachers focus more on thinking skills and less on memorization. In other words, the teachers who focused less on memorization improved their students’ test scores more than teachers with similar students who focused more on memorizing. This flies in the face of the assertion that teachers are forced to ‘teach to the test’ to improve their students’ test scores in order to meet state and federal accountability benchmarks. The data indicates that the best way for teachers to increase their students’ test scores is to teach them how to think and focus less on rote learning.

Making learning enjoyable is not a hallmark of a highly effective teacher. Another common assertion is that great teachers make learning fun. However, when you actually look at the data, about one-third of the students of the most effective teachers do not say their teacher makes learning enjoyable. Maybe that’s because most of the students of these teachers say their teacher doesn’t let students give up when the work gets hard. In the short run it may not be fun for students to get pushed beyond their comfort zone but in the long term those students will be much happier. So to improve student performance teachers should focus more on challenging and supporting their students than trying to make learning fun.

I am only on page 3 of the report so there is much more to go through but wanted to share with you a couple data points that show that effective teachers improve their students’ test scores by challenging their students and teaching them how to think not by ‘teaching to the test’. Stay tuned for more information about the TNTP report.  – Jim Hull

Filed under: instruction,teachers,Uncategorized — Jim Hull @ 3:41 pm





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