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June 13, 2017

New research: Community schools are an evidence-based strategy for school improvement

Last week, in a ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington D.C., six schools and community-based initiatives across the country were recognized for their excellence in utilizing the community schools model. The Coalition for Community Schools highlighted the considerable achievements of schools from New York City, Nashville, Chicago and Oakland.

CommunitySchoolsShotThe National Education Policy Center (NEPC) and the Learning Policy Institute (LPI) also presented new research at the event that supported the use of the community schools model as an evidence-based strategy for school improvement under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). ESSA requires that all interventions meet the “evidence-based” requirement, and this new research suggests that community schools more than meet that standard.

The community schools model may be a particularly effective strategy for improving schools in areas that struggle with high rates of poverty, because it creates a support system for students and families that addresses needs outside of the academic curriculum. Community schools create a system of partnerships and collaborations that address the needs of each child not only as a learner but also as a community member.

Because the needs and assets of each community are unique, there is no one formula for creating a community school. Each community school takes a unique approach to the model depending upon the circumstances of its students and families. However, all form partnerships and collaborations to create a set of integrated services that meet the needs of the whole child. Most are open before and after school—some even on weekends and during the summer—to provide students with wraparound support. Community schools provide services such as physical and mental health screenings, parent and community resources, and expanded learning opportunities like sports and arts programs.

Despite the variety of approaches, NEPC and LPI were able to identify common aspects of the community schools model that lead to success, including a wraparound student support system and a high degree of community collaboration and engagement. The newly released research also found that for every dollar invested in a community school, there will be a $10 to $15 return on investment within the community. In the awardee schools, chronic absenteeism and discipline referrals have decreased, test scores have increased, and fast academic growth has resulted in rising state ratings. Across the board, students and families report closer school and community ties. Using a wraparound support system, community schools may be a tool to close achievement gaps, prepare students for college and future careers, and promote positive outcomes throughout the broader community.






September 13, 2016

What Works Clearinghouse

The Institute of Education Sciences (IES), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Education, released its updated website today, and it is pretty spectacular: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc

IES sponsors and conducts research that provides evidence for education policies and practices.  Their new website makes it easier for policy makers to find evidence-based policies, which is especially helpful given the new flexibility that states and districts have under ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act).

You can now look up research for programs that have been tested for improving educational outcomes in various subjects (Math, Literacy, & Science), for student populations (English Learners, Students with Disabilities), and various age groups.  You can also cross-filter to find programs related to multiple groups (Math achievement for Students with Disabilities in High School, for example).  The evidence also shows how many studies were conducted, how many students were involved in the study, and the size of the effect.

My only critique would be the lack of evidence for some types of programs, but that’s a content-based issue, not related to the website’s format.  So, if you want a program that improves Teacher Excellence, you’ll only find one that has shown positive effects, which may or may not be applicable to your district.  But, the upside to this is that researchers and policy makers can more readily see where the gaps in evidence lie and start working to fill them in.






April 14, 2016

What’s different about ESSA?

What’s Different about ESSA?

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) created the starting point for equity-based education reforms. It established categorical aid programs for specific subgroups that were at-risk of low academic achievement. “Title I” comes from this act- it created programs to improve education for low-income students. No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was a reauthorization of ESEA which gave more power to the federal government to ensure that all students received an equitable education and that standardized testing was the vehicle to assess high-standards for schools.

In 2015, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) again reauthorized ESEA and changed much of the language and policies of NCLB. At its foundation, the law gave a lot of decision-making power back to the states. Although state’s still need to have high-standards, test their students, and intervene in low-performing schools, the state’s themselves will have the power to determine the “how”.

This table below provides the key differences between NCLB and ESSA and was compiled from several sources (listed at the bottom) which provide a great deal more detail and specifics for those interested in learning more.

 

ESSA Table

 

-Breanna Higgins

 

Sources:

http://www.ncesd.org/cms/lib4/WA01000834/Centricity/Domain/52/GeneralNCLB%20vs%20ESSA%20Comparison%20-%20Title%20I-Federl%20Programs.pdf

http://neatoday.org/2015/12/09/every-student-succeeds-act/

http://all4ed.org/essa/

http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/policy/ESEA_NCLB_ComparisonChart_2015.pdf

Filed under: Accountability,CPE,ESSA — Tags: , — Breanna Higgins @ 1:10 pm






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